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Elizabeth Hatz, William Mann, Miroslav Šik, Felix Görmann

10:00 – 14:00 hrs, November 14, 2018

How does an architectural idea come about? Since the Renaissance, architects have used drawings as a means of grasping thoughts and processing them into measurable information. Drawing is a means to examine spatial images and constructions, to give them a form and a dimension. As Francesco Dal Co noted: ‚Only through drawing are we able to discover the possibilities of the material world and those of images conveyed to us by tradition, through measurement and transformation processed into material suitable for the creation of beauty‘. The design is thus an examination of the proportions, dimensions and scales of a building which for the time being lives only in the imagination; the drawing a means of exploring a hidden truth, which might equal beauty.

The lectures will be held in English and German. Free entry. RSVP agt@uni-wuppertal.de

Interieur - Thinking architecture from within

The interior of the city and the interiors of building; both provide the backdrop for what is architecture’s first purpose: the life of the everyday and that of extraordinary moments. Architecture is interior. Yet in architectural practice the design of interiors often appears as a competing discipline to the work of the architect. The symposium Interieur – Thinking Architecture from Within, an initiative the Chair of Architectural Design and Building Typology and AGT Wuppertal (Chair of Architectural History and Theory) brings together different perspectives – design and reflections – in order to examine, how the perspective ‘from within’ changes architectural thought and practice: an architecture of small gestures and meaningful experiences, of light and shade, warmth and cold, of intimacy and anonymity. Speakers include artist/author/architect mark Pimlott (The Hague/ London) and the architects Gert Somers (ONO architecture, Antwerp), Inge Vinck (dvvt architecten, Ghent) and Jonathan Sergison (Sergison Bates, London). The conversations will be hosted by Susanne Gross (Professor Architectural Design and Building Typology) and Christoph Grafe (Professor of Architectural History and Theory).

The interior of the city and the interiors of building; both provide the backdrop for what is architecture’s first purpose: the life of the everyday and that of extraordinary moments. Architecture is interior. Yet in architectural practice the design of interiors often appears as a competing discipline to the work of the architect. The symposium Interieur – Thinking Architecture from Within, an initiative the Chair of Architectural Design and Building Typology and AGT Wuppertal (Chair of Architectural History and Theory) brings together different perspectives – design and reflections – in order to examine, how the perspective ‘from within’ changes architectural thought and practice: an architecture of small gestures and meaningful experiences, of light and shade, warmth and cold, of intimacy and anonymity. Speakers include artist/author/architect mark Pimlott (The Hague/ London) and the architects Gert Somers (ONO architecture, Antwerp), Inge Vinck (dvvt architecten, Ghent) and Jonathan Sergison (Sergison Bates, London). The conversations will be hosted by Susanne Gross (Professor Architectural Design and Building Typology) and Christoph Grafe (Professor of Architectural History and Theory).

'En route to work' - staged invisibilities in the city

‘En route to work’ – staged invisibilities in the city is a symposium, which took place in Wuppertal on 14/15 January 2016, as the result of a collaboration between Bergische Universität Wuppertal and Historischen Zentrum Wuppertal. Organised by Christoph Grafe, Elke Krasny and Oliver Ziegenhardt

 

Symposium brief:

When Friedrich Engels published ‘The Condition of the Working Class in England’ in 1845, it caused a great sensation. For the first time a social science and empirical work, intertwined with observations on political and philosophical theory, had been drawing attention to living conditions of the working classes. On the occasion of the 120th anniversary of the death of Engels in 2015 it seems appropriate to examine the current discourse on the city and its economic and cultural dimensions.

The present situation is characterised by changes in the economic and cultural geographies of cities that seem to be as dramatic as those Engels analysed in the mid nineteenth century. A society dominated by the service industries has created a new precariat, often with a migration background (and without the opportunities for political action afforded by representative democracy), that has to find a place in cities in which the systems of planning which were established in order to alleviate some of the symptoms of Manchester Capitalism are increasingly abolished. In a way that is comparable to the situation Engels described for the city of the industrial revolution, the new precariats who survive as servants of corporate industries, in the services industries or of the wealthy residents whose presence indicates the ‘urban renaissance’ in cities like London, New York, Brussels, Vienna or Amsterdam (and on a smaller scale in ‘successful’ cities like Cologne or Düsseldorf) tend to be invisible. As cities, once again, become more socially segregated than they have been for a long time, it is mainly in daily situations of early morning rush hours on public transport systems that the demographic and economic changes come into view. It is there that we can meet the cleaners, the nurses, the security workers or those making a living in catering, travelling between home (usually in the periphery) and various work destinations and combining more than one job in order to survive. The city of the new underclass is a city ‘en route to work’.

What does Engels' demand for ‘spatial justice’ mean in the current circumstances? Which forms of representation lend visibility to processes, which are usually left out of the accounts of the urban renaissance that many cities need and wish to present? Can designers address the volatilities of the current situation and which programmatic and organisational, but also aesthetic, strategies can be developed to achieve this? These are some of the questions we would like to discuss in Engels’ home town in the ‘En route to work’. The conference, hosted by the new Faculty of Architecture and Civil Engineering of the University of Wuppertal (in collaboration with the Historisches Zentrum Wuppertal and the Wuppertal Theatre) will bring together social scientists, philosophers, historians and designers to examine how these new challenges are shaping our cities and how they could be addressed by intelligent strategies of representation and design.

Speakers:

Ewald Engelen (Amsterdam) is a financial geographer, professor at the University of Amsterdam, co-author of the article: How to build a fairer city (The Guardian, 24 Sept 2013)

Karel Williams (Manchester) is a Researcher at the Centre for Research on Socio-cultural Change and Professor of Political Economy at the University of Manchester, co-author of How to build a fairer city

Franziska Bollerey (Delft/ Berlin) is Professor emerita of History of Architecture and Urbanism, TU Delft. Her special fields of interest are Utopian Concepts, Metropolises and the urban history and architecture of the 1920s. She has published numerous books and articles including Architekturkonzeptionen der utopischen Sozialisten (2. Ausg. 1991), Cornelis van Eesteren. Urbanismus zwischen de Stijl and C.I.A.M. (1999) und Myth Metropolis. The City as a Motif for Writers, Painters and Film Directors (2nd ed. 2010). 2015 war erarbeite sie einen Beitrag zur Ausstellung Wohnungsfrage im Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin.

Meike Schalk (Stockholm) is an architect and assistant professor on tenure track in urban design and urban theory at the KTH School of Architecture and the Built Environment. Her research on architecture and urban questions combines critical inquiry into issues of sustainability, questions of democracy and critical-creative participation in urban development processes, and participatory practice-led research.

Lionel Devlieger (Brüssel) is a partner in Rotor, a collective of people with a common interest in the material flows in industry and construction. On a practical level, Rotor handles the conception and realization of design and architectural projects, on a theoretical level Rotor develops critical positions on design, material resources, and waste through research, exhibitions, writings and conferences.
http://www.rotordb.org

Katherine Clarke (London) is a partner in MUF architecture/art, they operate as specialists in public realm architecture and art. The practice philosophy is driven by an ambition to realize the potential pleasures that exist at the intersection between the lived and the built.
http://www.muf.co.uk

Tom Emerson (London) is Partner (with Stephanie Macdonald) in 6A architects. He has taught at the Architectural Association and the University of Cambridge and published articles on architecture, literature and art. In 2010, he was appointed Professor of Architecture at the ETH Department of Architecture in Zurich. She leads the material research of the studio and recently 6a’s innovative architectural residency at the ICA.

http://www.6a.co.uk/information 

 

 

Constructing Habitat - Architectural Explorations and Strategies (copy 1)

A symposium organized by the chairs of Architectural Design and Building Typology (Prof. Susanne Gross) and Architectural History and Theory (Prof. Dr. Christoph Grafe) at the University of Wuppertal.

12.12.2014, 9:30 - 13:30 
Fachbereich D Architektur, Haspele Straße 27, D-42285 Wuppertal - Zeichensaal

The term Habitat carries associations with a multitude of considerations, ideas and assumptions. It describes living environments, complex systems of co-existence, inner and outer worlds. In the architectural discourse Habitat made its appearance in the post-war years as part of critical questioning of modern urban planning. The symposium 'Constructing Habitat' explores how the examination of everyday life situations and social ideas, of the cultures of cities and the observation of their landscapes, materializes in the construction of architecture.

Journeys in the periphery
Artist Boris Sieverts (Cologne) scans the edges and fringes of our cities for spaces and images that allow us to understand the economic logics and the social conditions governing the development of urban landscapes. These explorations of the known and the obscure reveal cities that cannot be incorporated into strategies of branding but which, at the same time, offer opportunities for new forms of appropriation and use.

Observations in the urban milieu
The image of urban situations as a collective autobiographical dream. Liberally quoting Aldo Rossi, this might describe the working method of Kaschka Knakiewicz and Axel Fickert (Zurich). In their projects, such as the Rigiplatz housing ensemble in Zurich, the architects engage with apparent or invisible necessities, certainties and contradictions, offering subtile references to Italian Neo-realism or to the civility of traditional urban forms. The examination of the site and its context of a project acquires the form of a highly sensitive observation of the environment which is then reworked into new images and spatial figures – a finely tuned architectural chemistry.

Narratives of Togetherness
As a young painter Mikel van Gelderen (Amsterdam), with other artists, settled in a former foundry and printing works in Amsterdam West and appropriated the building as a self-organised housing project. This experience of building as a collective activity and the compositional methods of the visual artist have been a common thread in the architectural projects of van Gelderen (since 1996 in collaboration with Jurjen Zeinstra). The work ranges from large-scale housing projects such as the IJ-dok building in Amsterdam’s city centre to operations on the edges of both architecture and the city and examine the programmatic opportunities and architectural expression of collectivity and individual freedom.

The house, the street and the city
Architecture organises the relationships and the demarcations between the intimate and the public. As a city characterised by the predominant model of the individual house and that, at the same time, dynamic and often contested public spaces, London is a laboratory for examinations of the architectural strategies for mediating between the requirements of domesticity and the arrangements of society. The projects of Stephen Taylor (London) for, among others, the House on Charlotte Road offer material settings and backdrops for making sense of everyday situations, through a refined yet robust treatment of spaces and the experience of the city and its historical layers. 

zuletzt bearbeitet am: 08.11.2018